Tests to Find Mesh

The last blog I wrote was in answer to the overwhelming number of women who now wonder was mesh used when they had a prolapse or hysterectomy surgery. That blog was all about getting your hospital records and where to seek the answers and I will include the link at the bottom of this blog. Many women ask me where they can get a test to determine if mesh is causing their health issues and pain. You should understand first that getting any test done and a good doctor who will listen to you and believe that mesh is your problem will go hand in hand. Tests can be misconstrued by any doctor who does not want to know about the serious complications you are having and even if you force an unwilling doctor to perform tests on you, it won’t do you a bit of good or help you in any way, if they aren’t willing to accept mesh is a huge issue. It will also be a huge waste of your time and money without a good doctor on board because so many woman have doctors who deny their complications even with all evidence presented to them.

Where can I find a good doctor many women ask? Here-in lies the real problem. The few we know about are on a drop down link at the top of this blog under doctors. You will also find no mesh hernia repair doctors. Even if they are there and you choose one, you should have a consult appointment and make sure the doctor will fix you or remove your mesh and are well trained in how to without implant products. This is because so few are in this day and age.

A test is just a test without good doctor representation. The doctor must have good people who are well trained to search for the mesh, using a test. The doctor has to be able to read what the test is showing and interpret where the mesh is and the complications it is causing. One test is not enough, at least three tests should be performed to check how your bladder looks inside and if mesh is eroding through the wall and this test is called a cystoscopy. I will give you a link at the bottom of this blog where I wrote about these tests when they were performed on me at UCLA Urology. I tried to explain in-depth what each test was about and how it felt. Another test is the urodynamic test which will show if the mesh is causing you urine retention and I can say I had this test done in Houston before the mesh was put into me and I can say the test when compared to the complete test done at UCLA before I had removal surgery, could only be described as a Mickey Mouse version. In other words, who does these tests is as important as the test itself.

Translabial Ultrasound

Everyone wants to know about the translabial ultrasound, where they can have this done closer to their home. You must reread the paragraph again about doctors to understand why your care and removal is not just about the tests. UCLA does the test in a competent manner and they have urologists who view and translate the problems mesh is causing in a woman’s body. So understand it is not just about the test, it is the whole package.

I found this on the UCLA site:

“Translabial Ultrasound to Evaluate Vaginal Mesh
Due to the large volume of patients presenting to UCLA with mesh-related vaginal surgery complications, the UCLA Urology and Radiology Departments have collaborated to develop an ultrasound technique to correctly identify previously placed mesh.  This helps surgeons in the pre-operative planning for the patients, as mesh is not visible on standard X-ray, CT, or MRI imaging.  This technique has helped us tremendously in the treatment of our patients.”

Pelvic Ultrasound

I have not had the pelvic ultrasound done and cannot tell you what I think about it or feel because I would be guessing. Once again you must find a doctor who knows and understand the problems and complications mesh causes, to get satisfactory results. Take your time and interview anyone you are thinking of using for your surgery. I was told about this other ultrasound test that can detect where mesh is and yesterday I went to the manufacturer’s site and downloaded the photos and details. BUT…. I did ask Dr. Raz of UCLA what he thought of this test and asked if he used it and his answer was very simple. “I’ll stick to the translabial ultrasound”. But this blog is about giving information so that you can research and make your own choices what tests you want and where you go for your removal.  Here is the link to the pelvic floor ultrasound information and to download it go to the click here section. Or you can go straight to the link to download the information. I did and it will ask about who your company is so I put in Mesh Angel Network. Then it will ask you for a reason you want it and it will give you a choice. I put in research. This is that link Then you will understand how this test works.

I wrote a blog after I came home from my own removal at UCLA two years ago and explained what these tests were like. You can read it here

Getting your records and learn what to look for read this link

I did write a blog some time back when a Canadian woman asked Dr. Raz why he used the translabial ultrasound and she shared it with me for this blog. Read it here

17 Comments

  1. Sylvia

    : Do you use translabial ultrasounds to locate the mesh before revision surgery?

    A: That is one technique, but I use dynamic pelvic MRI. This is an MRI machine that is actually watching as the patient is evacuating her bowels. It shoots multiple films while the lady is bearing down. You can see the movement plus you see the mesh; it comes out very nicely. It shows you if that mesh is invading any surrounding organs, like the bladder or into the rectum. It also gives you a very good picture if the mesh is close to the blood vessels. If it is close to the blood vessels, then I have to do surgery.

    I had one young lady who had the mesh very close to her major arteries. So I can shoot a dye into the blood vessels, and it will show me exactly where the blood vessels are and where the mesh is. So, I stay out of the danger zone.

    Linda, this was a response from Dr. Christopher Walker…..what do you think?? Have you heard of this procedure? I don’t even know if this doctor is reputable, but I would question shooting dye into the blood vessels.

    Reply
    1. lavalinda

      Sylvia I would be very wary about this. Dye in her blood vessels sounds way off to me and smacks of danger, but I will try to find out more. I do know he does mesh removals, but I personally would not use him. My opinion.

      Reply
      1. sylvia

        This sounds very dangerous to me. Thank you, Linda. Your article was really good, I also went to the website and read about the pelvic ultrasound. It showed pictures of the mesh sling, but they weren’t too clear and didn’t seem to pick all of the sling up.

        Reply
        1. lavalinda

          There are many risks in removal surgery if a doctor does not know what he/she is doing without adding another one. Read all the comments on this blog to know about side effects of dye in the veins. What happens if a woman is allergic to it and she is already under anesthesia? For me it would be too much to think about. http://blog.remakehealth.com/blog_Healthcare_Consumers-0/bid/10276/What-are-the-side-effects-of-CT-scan-and-MRI-scan-dye

          Reply
          1. Sylvia

            You are so right, Linda. We don’t need any added risks with dye. Homework is in order for all women.

  2. sylvia

    http://www.analogicultrasound.com/applications/pelvic-floor?mkt_tok=3RkMMJWWfF9wsRonvq7LZKXonjHpfsX56ekuX6GwlMI%2F0ER3fOvrPUfGjI4ATsBiI%2BSLDwEYGJlv6SgFSrXNMbRv0rgIXxE%3D Linda did you watch this short video with Dr. Elizabeth Mueller from Loyola Univ.Chicago Stritch School of Medicine? This was from the link you posted above. I was very impressed listening to her. This is what I would like to have done if warranted.

    Reply
    1. lavalinda

      Silvia, yes I saw it but don’t know anything about this doctor. I have seen many great videos but who she really it is hard to judge. You really need to speak to some of her patients, but they won’t let you. Perhaps you can ask outright on support groups.

      Reply
      1. Sylvia

        Okay, I will have to do research. I am not in any support groups. Thank you, Linda.

        Reply
        1. sylvia

          Two out of three reviews were just terrible. I am already turned off to her. She is very insulting to her patients.

          Reply
    2. Sandra Aadland

      I saw her video, flew out immediately, costing a fortune. I spent most of my time with her colleague, then Dr. Mueller walked in like a bull, looked inside vagina, then, looked at area where I have hernia and pulled and pulled and pulled; like she was mad. Then said if I had a hernia I’d be off the table. She didn’t offer the test, and how many of you know a doctor who is a specialist in one area goes to another area – I reported her. It was inhumane. I have to laugh because it was surreal. Anyone who knows about mesh knows it becomes brittle and I’m having awful problems with hernia but I went to see her specifically for that test, which was not done. She also complained about all the women whom she sees who want their mesh out. Good luck if you choose to see her – I hope she has a better day than when I saw her. I reported her but I know that’s a waste of time. That video needs to be pulled off or she needs to address her actions. Please post if you see her and have a good experience

      Reply
      1. Linda (Post author)

        I am glad you posted this Sandra. Dr. Mueller should not have treated you this way.

        Reply
  3. Lisa

    I had mesh put in me in 2008. (post complete hysterectomy) Things seemed ok for about 2 years and then the pain started and I started to have pain and bleed every time I had intercourse. The mesh started rolling and twisting at the top of my vagina which made a hard band at the top of my uterus. One night during intercourse my boyfriends penis ripped it partially out. (blood everywhere)went to ER and I had erosion and was scheduled for partial removal in summer 2011. In fall 2012 I started having problems walking when there was any elevation or decline. I get stiff and in pain from my hip/sacrum area and down both sides to mid thighs if the ground is not level (any incline or decline makes me freeze up)I would like to know if you’ve ever heard of the left over mesh adhering to the tendons that deal with walking? I really feel tight and stiff in my tendons that run down the butt to the thighs when I walk. VERY FRUSTRATED because I used to be an avid hiker. The more elevation the better and now I can barely walk long enough to grocery shop!!!

    Reply
    1. lavalinda

      Lisa I am so sorry this happened to you but I am afraid it is so common. Your symptoms tell me you probably have more mesh in you and more than likely the arms/anchors that hold it in place. They probably did what they call a ‘revision’ which means they clipped off any eroded mesh. Please get all your hospital operative reports to find out what was done and you need to understand the type of mesh you had/have. Nerve damage is a huge issue and can only be relieved if it is all removed by a competent doctor. Look up at the top to see doctors. The best of course are at UCLA.

      Reply
  4. Lisa

    I do have the arms/anchors left inside me. I can’t get a Dr to help me. Are you aware of any scan that will show my Dr that this is causing me issues? I now am having difficulty holding my bowels along with the walking issues.

    Reply
    1. lavalinda

      Mesh shows up when the translabial ultrasound is used but I am not sure if it shows the anchors. The reason they don’t remove the anchors is because if they don’t know what they are doing you can bleed to death. Dr. Raz is an expert which is why we all go out to UCLA. The info link for him is at the top of this blog under doctors. While the anchors are left in us many women experience terrible pain. I hope you can make arrangement to travel out there to see him.

      Reply
  5. Bernadette

    I found this on the UCLA site.
    Translabial Ultrasound to Evaluate Vaginal Mesh
    Due to the large volume of patients presenting to UCLA with mesh-related vaginal surgery complications, the UCLA Urology and Radiology Departments have collaborated to develop an ultrasound technique to correctly identify previously placed mesh. This helps surgeons in the pre-operative planning for the patients, as mesh is not visible on standard X-ray, CT, or MRI imaging. This technique has helped us tremendously in the treatment of our patients.

    Reply
    1. lavalinda

      Bernadette it is so true and I hope one day there will be other doctors who will do this test.

      Reply

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